A blast from the past: Childhood memories before my eyes

Last week I got very excited in Waterstones. I was actually birthday present shopping and Waterstones have quite a nice gift section so I decided to browse. Only it was a really small Waterstones and the gift section was tiny so I had a little browse through the children’s section instead. Out of the corner of my eye, I spotted the title of a book that took me right back to my childhood.

_MG_4498When I was about seven, my older brother brought a book club leaflet home from school and I was allowed to order a book. I chose one called ‘My Best Fiend’ by Sheila Lavelle. I don’t remember the reason. Maybe I liked the cover, maybe I liked the blurb or maybe he suggested it. Either way, this lovely new book arrived and from the very opening paragraph, I was hooked. It was the very first book I read more than once. In fact, I probably read it a dozen times or more (as you can see from the battered state it’s in!) Imagine my delight when ‘The Fiend Next Door’ was released three years later in 1982. Another gem to be read many times over.

It didn’t just appeal to me at that age. In early secondary school, I still loved it and even wrote a book review on it although I was absolutely devastated when it came back with a low mark and “fiend” corrected to “friend” throughout. To this day, I’m still annoyed with myself for not challenging the teacher to up my marks because I had spelt it correctly. You see, the story is about Charlie and her best friend Angela who lives next door. Only Angela is what we might call a “toxic friend” these days as she repeatedly drops Charlie in it and behaves like a right little madam, hence “fiend” being a more appropriate descriptor.

_MG_4499So, back to last week, I was stunned to spot the books on the shelves. Nobody I know has ever heard of them and I assumed they’d have gone out of print long ago. I quickly purchased the pair for my seven year old (figuring that mine might fall apart if I gave her those) and I hope she enjoys them as much as I did.

For some strange reason, these are just about the only paperbacks I’ve retained from my childhood. I wonder what made me hang onto them. 

_MG_4492Another book that had a big impact on me was one that was read to us at school. ‘Run for Your Life’ by David Line tells the story of Szolda and Woolcott who overhear a conversation between two men and believe they’ve heard a murder plot. They then get into danger trying to prove they were right. I don’t know if it was on the curriculum or if it was just a book our teacher selected but it was absolutely gripping and I can still remember the desperation for them to get home safe and sound. A few years ago, I decided to see if I could track it down to re-read it and was delighted to find it’s still in print.

I’m going to become more predictable now with my final childhood memories. I absolutely loved and adored Enid Blyton. I admit that I haven’t read any of some of her famous works like The Secret Seven, St Clare’s, Naughtiest Girl etc. but I absolutely adored:

  • The Famous Five
  • The Enchanted Wood/Faraway Tree series
  • Malory Towers

_MG_4513      _MG_4511 _MG_4461

I read all of these many times over and I suspect that the reason I don’t still have them is that they were so well-read that they fell apart!

_MG_4502I’d like to say I loved Roald Dahl but I confess I’ve only ever read two books by him: ‘James & The Giant Peach’ and ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’. I don’t know why I’ve only read these (and, again, several times over) rather than trying others. I know ‘James & the Giant Peach’ was one we read in class at primary school so that’s why I got into that one. Perhaps we read ‘Fantastic Mr Fox’ too. Really can’t remember. My little girl has a box set and she adores ‘The Enormous Crocodile’.

_MG_4496My final blast from the past is another slightly predictable one: ‘Anne of Green Gables’ by Lucy Maud Montgomery. This is my only other original paperback besides the Fiend books. Again, not sure why I kept it. I actually had it for years and never read it but then I watched the wonderful Canadian TV drama series (1985) on a repeat several years later and absolutely loved it. I read my book and borrowed the rest in the series from a friend. Such a lovely story and what a hero Gilbert Blythe is.

That’s my trail through part of my childhood. It doesn’t represent everything I read but it does represent my absolute favourites. I’d love to hear yours and I’d really love to hear from anyone who is familiar with Sheila Lavelle’s wonderful books or ‘Run for Your Life.’

Thanks for reading.

Jessica xx

 

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6 thoughts on “A blast from the past: Childhood memories before my eyes

  1. Great post, as always. I loved Anne of Green Gables too. I think the cover of the original version of ‘The Fiend Next Door’ is a million times better than the new version, but perhaps that’s because I’m a dinosaur now! xx

    • Thanks Jay. I prefer the old version too although I never liked the sequel cover quite so much. In the book, Charlie is a tomboy and she looks like one on the original but the new cover has her looking very girly in a pink top which she’d NEVER have worn. Shame. Don’t think you’re a dinosaur; think you’re spot on! xx

  2. Loved this blog, Jessica. I, too, remember the My Best Fiend books, because, as a librarian, I used them over and over in primary schools when promoting reading and they always went down well. I have the same edition of Anne of Green Gables on my shelf! My favourite was Anne of Avonlea. And, yes, I loved Enid Blyton as well – in particular Malory Towers and the Famous Five. It’s because of Enid Blyton that I churned out my own boarding school stories as a child.

    • Thanks so much for stopping by, Sue. and can I say how delighted I am to find someone who remembers My Best Fiend! Yay! Unfortunately I don’t remember the Anne books quite as well as I remember the TV series as I had that on video and watched it over and over again whereas Anne of Green Gables was the only book I owned; I’d borrowed the others from a friend. Must read them again one day. What happened to your boarding school stories? Do you still have them?

  3. Enjoyed this post. As a Canadian, Anne of Green Gables (indeed all of L.M. Montgomery’s books) were an important part of my childhood reading too. As I reread them as an adult (and other children’s books too), I see new layers of meaning.

    • Thanks for commenting, Jen. Isn’t it funny how certain books seem to have had such an international appeal. When I watched the series, I wanted to move to PE Island! I was fortunate enough to go to Canada for my honeymoon but I don’t think it was anywhere near there (we went to British Columbia) although I could stand corrected; my UK geography is poor so my Canadian is appalling! Must re-read them one day as it would be lovely to approach the stories as an adult too 🙂

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